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Camerons Bubble, New Tory campaign song I’m forever Blowing Bubbles.

What was Cameron referring too in his West Ham winning reference?
Villa Fans first have this to say. var _fanchant = ‘my-old-man’;

Aston Villa Football Chants

   Cameron man said ‘be a Hammers fan’,
And I said’ b***ocks you’re a c**t (you’re a c**t),
We hate the blues and we’re gonna show it,
We hate the blues and we f**king know it,

With Spinksy and Burchy Alan Mcanally,
They’re the boys who gonna do us fine,
You support the blues ur a blue nose b***ard and you ain’t no friend of mine,

ALL TOGETHER NOW…      

https://apis.google.com/js/platform.js http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pub-config/ca-pub-6947747175004950.js

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I’m forever blowing bubbles,
Pretty bubbles in the air,
They fly so high,
Nearly reach the sky,
Then like my dreams,
They fade and die.
 Fortune’s always hiding,
 I’ve looked everywhere,
I’m forever blowing bubbles,
 Pretty bubbles in the air.

 Verse 1
 I’m dreaming dreams,
 I’m scheming schemes,
 I’m building castles high.
They’re born anew,
Their days are few,
Just like a sweet butterfly.
And as the daylight is dawning,
They come again in the morning.

 Verse 2

 When shadows creep,
When I’m asleep,
To lands of hope I stray.
 Then at daybreak,
When I awake,
My bluebird flutters away.
Happiness new seemed so near me,
Happiness come forth and heal me.

 B side to Fuck off back to eton.

 Don’t be fooled by the Tory bubble, the west ham freudian slip is clearly a vieled reference to the hammers anthem adopted as the tory unofficial campaign song

 
Financial Bubbles.
1. The system distributes money from the bottom 90% to the top 10% Because 97% of the money in the UK is created by banks, someone must pay interest on nearly every pound in the UK. The bottom 90% of the UK pays more interest to banks than they ever receive from them, which results in a redistribution of income from the bottom 90% of the population to the top 10%. Collectively we pay £165m every day in interest on personal loans alone (not including mortgages), and a total of £213bn a year in interest on all our debts.

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